Sunrise to Sunset: Why I love Maine

Keep close to Nature’s heart… and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.
-John Muir

Ogunquit Sunrise
Ogunquit Sunrise. I used a 3-stop ND Grad from Benro Master Filters to maintain the color in the sky and the detail in the foreground rocks, and a 3-stop ND filter to slow the exposure enough to get the water to blur as it crashed over the rocks.

Yesterday I had the type of day that reminds me why I love Maine so much.  I started the day before dawn, driving to a seaside walkway in Ogunquit known as Marginal Way. It’s called Marginal Way because it is situated on a slim margin of land between the town and the Atlantic Ocean.

Morning Calm on Marginal Way
Morning Calm on Marginal Way. Here I used a 10-stop ND filter to make a long exposure of 4 minutes to allow the water to blur so much it becomes smooth. It’s essentially the same composition as the image above, but the use of a long exposure completely changes the scene.

Arriving shortly before sunrise, I began walking the path at Marginal Way in that soft blue light before the sun breaks the horizon and the sky turns pink. There were hundreds of spots to choose from, but I settled on a small cove created by several large rock formations, where I noticed waves occasionally crashing over the rocks on an otherwise calm morning. There was a thin haze in the air, hanging over the water, filtering the light as the sun rose. The sky turned pink and even a bit red as the sun finally broke the horizon and waves washed over the rocks in front of me. It was just enough to show the motion of the Atlantic washing over the rocks, but not as violently as during a high tide or a storm. It was a perfect morning, worth getting up early for and the best way I know to start a day.

Dawn on Marginal Way
As the sun rose higher in the sky, I wanted to capture the soft, warm light on the rocks. I decided to again use a long exposure, again, for four minutes, to smooth the water and allow the warm light to paint the rocks.

Next, I needed to take care of some personal business- car inspection and registration.  After quickly dispatching of that, I went home and edited my images from sunrise. It was just barely 10am, so I still had all day to spend and no idea how to spend it. I wanted to go out photographing, but I didn’t know where. Not that I was bored with the coast, but I really wanted to go somewhere I hadn’t been before. I was glad I did.

Afternoon on Tumbledown Mountain
As I cleared the trees, this was the scene that I was presented with. It was so serene and peaceful. I added a Benro Master Filters Slim Circular Polarizer to help manage reflection and to darken the blue sky some more.

I settled on Tumbledown Mountain, two hours north of me. I wanted a hike, but I have requirements for where I’ll hike. It must be picturesque, with great views and some photographic interest. I’d Googled Tumbledown and saw enough that I decided it was worth a visit.  So I made my way up to Tumbledown and hoped my GPS wouldn’t lead me astray.

Tumbledown Mountain has an elevation of 3,054 feet at its highest point. The easiest route is about a two-hour hike and climb to the top.  I chose this route, being out of shape and really not caring how I got up there. While the climb is important, for me, it’s about the views. I really wasn’t prepared for what I found when I got to just below the summit.

View at Sunset from Tumbledown Mountain
I didn’t have as much time to explore as I’d normally like. With the sun setting I needed to at least get back to the trail beneath the field of boulders. I took one last look at the view before heading down.

After a long hike up an old logging road, a climb over a rocky trail, lots of cursing myself for undertaking this climb, and finally, a more vertical scramble over rocks and boulders, I made it to a ridge and some trees.  As I followed the trail, I came through the trees and was presented with a scene straight out of a Disney movie. Instantly I knew the climb had been worth it and I would be back again.

At the top of Tumbledown Mountain, just below the summit, is an alpine lake. The water is clear, the air is fresh and sweet. It is as inviting a scene as I’ve ever been witness to.  As the sun began to drop just below the peak, I began to photograph, knowing I had to work fast and get back down over the rock scramble before total darkness hit. I figured I could handle the footpath in the dark but the rock scramble I needed light for. I quickly explored and made plans to return soon.

The top of Tumbledown instantly became one of my favorite places in Maine, and it only took me 20 years to find it.  But the true wonder of yesterday was the fact that I could start my day watching the sun rise on the coast, and finish it watching the sun set in the mountains, and it only took me two hours to get from one to the other. Maine is the perfect place for me.

Dusk on Tumbledown Mountain
As the sun went behind the peak, I set up for a long exposure, again using the Benro Master Filters 10-stop ND, along with a 3-stop ND grad, to help control the wide range of contrast between the sky and foreground. This was another four minute exposure that smoothed the water and allowed the cloud in the sky to blur.

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